Cat World > Cat Health > Cat Symptoms Checker-What Is Wrong With My Cat?

Cat Symptoms Checker-What Is Wrong With My Cat?

 

Abdomen (painful)

Abdomen (swollen)

 

  • Ascites
  • Bloat
  • Constipation/megacolon
  • Cushing's disease

  • Intestinal blockage

  • Intestinal worms

  • Obesity

  • Pregnancy

  • Pyometra - Uterine infection.

  • Ruptured bladder

  • Tumours of the liver, spleen, kidney, intestine.

Aggressive behaviour

 

Painful conditions including:

Other:

Alopecia (hair loss)

 

Pruritic (itchy)

Non pruritic (non itchy)

Anal bleeding
  • Constipation
  • Polyps
  • Hookworm
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Cancer
  • Colitis
  • Infection
  • Blood clotting disorders
Anal scooting
  • Constipation
  • Tumour
  • Worms
Anorexia (not eating)

Ataxia (unsteady gait)

 

 

Bad breath (halitosis)

 

Bald spots
  • Abscess
  • Ringworm
  • Food allergy
  • Flea allergy dermatitis
  • Miliary dermatitis
  • Feline acne
  • Folliculitis
  • Squamous cell carcinoma
  • Topical medications (reaction)
  • Vaccine (reaction)
  • Hyperthyroidism
  • Cushing's syndrome
  • Eosinophillic granuloma complex
Black tarry stools
Blindness

 

Bleeding (excessive)
  • Thrombocytopenia (low platelets)
  • Hemophilia
  • Poisoning (snake, toxins etc)

Blood in stool (bright red)

 

 

Blood in stool (dark/tarry)
  • Gastrointestinal ulcers
  • Foreign body
  • Ingestion of blood (nosebleed, bleeding in the lungs, dental bleeding)
  • Blood clotting disorders
  • Aspirin poisoning
  • Tumours
  • Vitamin D toxicity
  • Trauma
  • Infection
Blood in urine (hematuria)
Breathing (rapid)
Coma
Constipation
  • Dehydration

  • Reluctance to defecate due to behavioural issues.

  • Obstruction of the colon

  • Dietary

  • Drugs and medications

  • Painful defecation

  • Neurological

  • Hypothyroidism

  • Pelvic injuries

  • Metabolic/hormonal

  • Idiopathic

 

Coughing

 

Crying
  • Hunger

  • Estrus

  • New kitten: If you have just obtained your kitten it may meow excessively for the first few days. Leaving it's mother and siblings and moving into a new house with new owners is a huge change to your kitten.

  • Loss of a companion: Cats are sensitive creatures and form close bonds with their owners and other pets in the household. If there are changes to the family dynamics, such as a separation, or the loss of an animal, this may cause your cat to meow more than usual.

  • Moving house: Again, this is a big change for your cat and may result in it becoming more vocal.

  • Attention seeking: Excessive vocalisation may be a result of your cat is feeling lonely or not receiving enough attention from it's owner.

  • Outside influences: A neighbourhood cat coming onto your cat's territory.

  • Old age: Some old cats may meow excessively. This usually happens when they begin to lose their cognitive functions.

  • Medical problems: If your cat is sick or in pain it may result in excessive vocalisation.

  • Nocturnal behaviour: Cats by nature are nocturnal, and may meow more during the night.

Decreased appetite
  • See anorexia
     
Dehydration
  • Vomiting and or diarrhea

  • Sickness - A sick cat may go off it's food and water and therefore not receive enough fluids and become dehydrated.

  • Increased urination - Medical conditions such as diabetes and renal failure in which the cat urinates more often may cause dehydration.

  • Heatstroke

  • Lack of available, fresh drinking water.

  • Shock

  • Blood loss

  • Fever

 

Diarrhea
Dilated pupils
  • Brain tumour
  • Certain drugs
  • Feline dysautonomia
  • Head trauma
  • Insulinoma
  • Multiple myeloma
  • Poisoning
  • Retinal detachment
Drinking (increased thirst)

 

Drooling
Dull hair coat
Excessive blinking
Eye discharge
  • Blepharitis (inflammation of the eyelid)

  • Blocked tear ducts

  • Feline upper respiratory infections (cat flu)

  • Conjunctivitis (inflammation of the conjunctiva)

  • Dry eye

  • Allergy

  • Keratitis

  • Epiphora (excessive tear production)

  • Foreign bodies in the eye

  • Trichiais (rare in cats, eyelashes growing from the eyelid and rubbing against the cornea causing irritation)

  • Trauma

  • Uveitis (watery discharge)

Excessive tearing (eye)
Exercise intolerance
  • Blastomycosis
  • Pyothorax
  • Lungworm
  • Diaphragmatic hernia
Fading kitten syndrome
  • Blood type incompatibility
  • Congenital defect
  • Environmental temperature (too hot or cold)
  • Maternal neglect
  • Dehydration
  • Inadequate nutrition during birth
  • Viral, bacterial or parasitic infection
Fever
  • Blastomycosis
  • Infection (bacterial, viral, protozoal)
  • Idiopathic (unknown cause)
  • Cancer
  • Some drugs
  • Disease of the endocrine (hormonal) system (hypocalcemia)
  • Glycogen storage disease
  • Lungworm
  • Plague
  • Pyothorax
  • Cryptococcosis
  • Osteomyelitis
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus
  • Tularemia
  • Spider bite
  • Ecoli
  • Pseudorabies
  • Paracetamol poisoning
  • Campylobacteriosis
Frequent urination
  • Bladder stones
  • Cystitis
  • Diabetes
  • Acute or chronic kidney failure
  • Kidney stones
  • Urinary tract infection

 

Gums (colour)
Hair loss
  • See alopecia
Head tilt
Head shaking
  • Ear mites

  • Ear infection or inflammation

  • Polyps

  • Demodicosis

  • Feline scabies

  • Foreign object in ear

  • Allergies

  • Insect bites and stings

 

Hunger (increased)
  • Not feeding enough
  • Hyperthyroidism
  • Acromegaly
  • Cushing's syndrome
  • Insulin producing tumour
  • Diabetes
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar)
  • Pregnancy
  • Lactation
  • Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency
  • Intestinal parasites
  • Certain medications
Hyperactivity
Hypersalivation
Inappropriate urination

 

Increased heart rate
Increased thirst
  • See drinking
Increased urination
  • Vitamin D toxicity
Itchy anus

Itchy ear

 

 

Itchy skin

 

Lethargy
Limping
  • Arthritis
  • Arterial thromboembolism
  • Bone cancer
  • Broken bone
  • Calicivirus
  • Declawing pain
  • Joint dislocation
  • Foreign body (glass, splinter etc)
  • Insect bite or sting
  • Spinal cord or nerve injury
  • Lyme disease
  • Laceration
  • Sprains
  • Nail injuries
  • Overgrown claws
Nasal discharge
  • Upper respiratory infection (cat flu)

  • Nasal polyps

  • Bacterial infection

  • Fungal infection

  • Nasal tumours

  • Head trauma

  • Foreign objects in the nasal cavity

  • Allergies

  • Cleft palate

  • Cheyletiellosis

  • Tooth root abscesses

  • Pneumonia

 

Nosebleeds
  • Blood clotting disorders such as haemophilia
  • Ingestion of poisons (rat poison, aspirin). It is possible for cats to either directly consume rat poison or to indirectly become poisoned by killing and/or eating a rodent who has ingested rat poison itself
  • Foreign body (such as grass seed)
  • Trauma (running into something, hit by car etc)
  • Anemia
  • Cancer
  • Dental abscess
  • Infections (bacterial, viral, fungal) which can cause ulceration
  • Liver failure
  • Kidney failure
  • High blood pressure

 

Painful abdomen

 

  • See abdomen
Painful urination
  • Cystitis
  • Bladder infection
  • Urinary crystals
  • Kidney stones
Panting
Paralysis
  • Aortic thromboembolism (saddle thrombosis)
  • Tick poisoning
  • Stroke
  • Trauma
  • Tumour
  • Slipped disc
  • Viral infection
  • Toxoplasmosis
  • Meningitis
Photophobia (sensitivity to light)
Pupils dilated (see dilated pupils)  
Pupils (fixed)
Pupils (odd/different sized)
  • Anterior uveitis
  • Corneal ulcers
  • Certain drugs/medications
  • Glaucoma
  • Head trauma
  • Horner's syndrome
  • Iris atrophy
  • Spastic pupil syndrome
  • Oculomotor nerve paralysis
  • Stroke
  • Tumours
Rapid/shallow breathing
(tachypnea)
  • Anemia
  • Pneumonia
  • Metabolic acidosis
  • Hernia
  • Tumours
  • Airway obstruction
  • Pleural effusion
  • Pulmonary edema
  • Pain
  • Hyperthyroidism
  • Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
  • Heart failure
  • Hypovolemic shock
  • Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar)
Scabby ears
  • Pemphigus
  • Ringworm
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus
  • Allergy (food, contact, inhalant, insect, flea allergy dermatitis)
  • Sunburn
  • Squamous cell carcinoma
  • Frostbite
  • Hypothyroidism
Scabs (neck)
  • Flea allergy dermatitis
  • Abscess
Scabs (back)
  • Flea allergy dermatitis
  • Abscess
Seizures

 

Straining to urinate

 

Swollen abdomen
  • See abdomen
Swollen breast and/or nipple
  • Lactating

  • Pregnancy

  • Galactostasis

  • Feline mammary hypertrophy

  • Mammary hyperplasia

  • Mammary cancer

  • Mastitis

Swollen chin
  • Insect bite or sting

  • Abscess

  • Feline acne

  • Oral cancer

  • Dental abscess

  • Rodent ulcer

  • Allergy

 

Swollen eye
  • Conjunctivitis

  • Foreign body in the eye

  • Entropion (eyelid folding inwards)

  • Allergies

  • Viral or bacterial infection

 

Swollen lymph nodes
  • Infection

  • Inflammation

  • Allergy

  • Cancer

Swollen paw

 

  • Foreign object

  • Declawing complications

  • Ingrown claw

  • Abscess

  • Plasma cell pododermatitis

  • Burns

  • Frostbite

  • Cuts and abrasions

  • Paracetamol poisoning

  • Insect bite or sting

 

Tremors
Vomiting

Food/Diet Related:

  • Eating too fast
  • Rapid change in the diet. If you are going to switch brands or type of food, gradually introduce the new type over a few days
  • Eating inappropriate foods such as old or mouldy food, food inappropriate for cats etc.
  • Food allergies
  • Food intolerance
  • Foreign object. Bones, wool etc.
  • Ingestion of toxins such as antifreeze, aspirin, poisonous plants etc.
  • Parasites
  • Intestinal worms

Medical related:

 

Vomiting blood
  • Foreign body
  • Ulcers (stomach, esophagus)
  • Aspirin poisoning
  • Inflammation (stomach, esophagus)
  • Blood clotting disorders
  • Infections
  • Tumours (stomach, esophagus)
  • Certain medications
  • Intestinal worms
  • Swallowed blood (from mouth, nose, esophagus)
Wheezing
  • Anaphylaxis
  • Asthma
  • Cat flu
  • Foreign body lodged in airways
  • Hairballs
  • Heartworm
  • Lungworm

 

Weakness

 

Weight loss