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Husband & His Doctor Blaming Cats For Asthma


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#1 presley23

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Posted 23 May 2015 - 12:24 AM

Hi folks

 

Tearing my hair out over here looking for a little guidance or just wondering if anyone else has had a similar issue.  Basically, my husband has a touch of asthma (not chronic) and it has been getting gradually worse over the last few years.  He has put that down to the time that he and I got married and I moved in with two of my cats.  He went along to the doctor yesterday and the doctor basically agreed with him, blamed the cats and told him to get rid of them!  As you can understand, I am beside myself with this news.

 

A little backgound: hubby and I have been together for 5 years, I had cats well before he came into the picture so this was not new information to him.  He is not a "cat person", preferring dogs, and has always made his dislike of my cats quite clear.  After we got married, we moved into his house, and he has always been very vocal about not wanting the cats to be here.  I feel he has told the doctor exactly what he wanted in order to blame the cats and finally have a genuine reason for getting rid of them.

 

I'm really at my wits end here.  I feel as though I'm being a massive cow by not taking his health concerns into consideration, but I feel he is not seeing my side at all.  Not only are these cats my family (my babies), but they both have health issues (one with diabetes) so I am not going to just hand them off to someone and not look back.

 

Anyone had to deal with anything similar?



#2 Analog6

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Posted 23 May 2015 - 05:31 AM

It's a tough one.  It could be a thousand other things - dust mites - far more likely than cat dander - allergies to cats a don't often manifest as asthma; air/soil quality - you do live in a former industrial region; old house; etc.  Swimming in chlorine pools can cause asthma, I recently found, it's the fumes that sit above the water.

 

Has his doctor given him a thorough examination and taken all genetic and environmental condition into account? HAs the doctor visited your house to assess the environmental factors? What about diet?  If hubby wants you to get rid of the cats then get him to prove it is really them.

 

By the same token, do you keep the cats clean, brush them regularly, vacuum often etc?  Do they have an outside enclosure where they can spend set periods of the day, either weather permitting or with a weatherproof shelter if there is no open access to the house.

 

Causes of asthma from the site: http://www.asthmaaus....au/Causes.aspx

Note allergens are4 LAST on the list.

  
Factors contributing to development of asthma

  • Genetic factors are involved
  • Having a parent with asthma, eczema, or hayfever increases a child’s risk of developing asthma
  • Obesity increases the risk of developing asthma
  • More boys have asthma than girls. This may be due to young boys having smaller lungs than girls
  • In adults, there are more women with asthma than men 
  • Smoking during pregnancy can damage a baby’s lungs and lead to respiratory illness
  • Children of mums who smoke are four times more likely to wheeze
  • Infants who are breast-fed are less likely to wheeze than those who have cow or soy milk or formula
  • Children who are exposed to tobacco smoke have more chest infections
  • Children who have respiratory infections when they are infants may be up to 40% more likely to develop asthma
  • Indoor and outdoor air pollution may make asthma symptoms worse although it is not clear whether pollution causes asthma
  • Exposure to certain substances in the workplace can cause occupational asthma.
  • Modern diets may have contributed to the higher levels of asthma and allergy. This could be due to factors such as an increase in processed foods and polyunsaturated fatty acid from margarine and vegetable oil, and a reduction in antioxidants from fresh fruit and vegetables and lower levels of polyunsaturated fatty acid from oily fish
  • Exposure to allergens may have an impact on whether you will develop asthma, but this is still unclear


#3 presley23

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 09:01 PM

Hi, I just wanted to thank you for your very detailed response.  The issue took a back seat for a few weeks as, just after I posted this, one of my fur babies (who is diabetic) had a massive relapse and was in emergency hospital for a couple of weeks.  He is home again now, so the issue has risen again, but I am going along with hubby to the doctor on Friday to insist on allergy testing to begin with.  I'm also looking into having a cat enclosure built so they can spend majority of the day outside.  Thanks again for your information, fingers crossed we can get this resolved without too many tears!



#4 Analog6

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Posted 25 June 2015 - 07:01 AM

Good to hear back from you, let us know how it goes.